The Indirect Object in Italian (II)

A few weeks ago, I wrote about the Italian equivalent to English’s indirect object. Remember, we learned that the Italian equivalent to English’s indirect object is almost always complemento di termine*: Ho regalato quel libro a Michele. I gave Michele that book as a gift. In our example above, Michele is the indirect object or our complemento di termine. ...

Il perfetto congiuntivo! Our newest book!

Il perfetto congiuntivo! Our newest book!
Our latest book, Il perfetto congiuntivo: Everything You Need To Know About the Italian Subjunctive, is now available electronically in the iBook Store, Google Play, Scribd, and as a print replica for the Kindle Fire and Kindle apps (for your tablet, iPad, PC/Mac, etc.) on Amazon!* Our print edition should be ready in a week or so! ...

Some Rules Regarding Numbers

In our book, Il vero italiano: Your Guide To Speaking “Real” Italian, we look at some useful rules about using numbers (p. 103-107). Let’s review some important rules about numbers: Remember that cento (100) and mille (1,000) do not drop their final vowel before -uno or -otto: 101 = centouno 108 = centootto 1001 = milleuno 1008 = milleotto Remember that uno is not used ...

Double Plurals

Ciao a tutti! Today we are going to talk about double plurals in Italian. These are nouns that have two plural forms. Generally, the masculine plural indicates an abstract or subjective meaning, while the feminine form of the plural is the more objective or concrete meaning. Note, however, that this is not a hard and ...

The Indirect Object in Italian (I)

Pronouns can be difficult to master in Italian, especially those pronouns that function as direct and indirect objects. This short post will start our regular updates for 2015! I thought that it would be good to start the year by learning about the indirect object — an aspect of Italian grammar that many students find ...