Get an extra 10% off our ebook 3-PAK!

For the rest of April, you can get an additional 10% off our ebook 3-PAK on our store on Selz! Just use coupon code PRIMAVRA15! You’ll get DRM*-free copies of Il vero italiano, Il vero italiano 2, and our latest book Il perfetto congiuntivo (as well as possible future updates if and when they are made). You can find our ...

Understanding verbs: dare

Understanding verbs: dare
The verb dare means to give. It is an irregular verb in the present tense and is used in a variety of idiomatic expressions. Dare can be seen below in the present tense:         Dare requires avere in compound tenses; the past participle is dato. Nota bene: Don’t forget about the accent mark on the third person singular, ...

The Indirect Object in Italian (II)

A few weeks ago, I wrote about the Italian equivalent to English’s indirect object. Remember, we learned that the Italian equivalent to English’s indirect object is almost always complemento di termine*: Ho regalato quel libro a Michele. I gave Michele that book as a gift. In our example above, Michele is the indirect object or our complemento di termine. ...

Il perfetto congiuntivo! Our newest book!

Il perfetto congiuntivo! Our newest book!
Our latest book, Il perfetto congiuntivo: Everything You Need To Know About the Italian Subjunctive, is now available electronically in the iBook Store, Google Play, Scribd, and as a print replica for the Kindle Fire and Kindle apps (for your tablet, iPad, PC/Mac, etc.) on Amazon!* Our print edition should be ready in a week or so! ...

Some Rules Regarding Numbers

In our book, Il vero italiano: Your Guide To Speaking “Real” Italian, we look at some useful rules about using numbers (p. 103-107). Let’s review some important rules about numbers: Remember that cento (100) and mille (1,000) do not drop their final vowel before -uno or -otto: 101 = centouno 108 = centootto 1001 = milleuno 1008 = milleotto Remember that uno is not used ...